Evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy

Appendix B: Data Collection Instruments

Key Informant Interview Guides

AJS Evaluation Interview Guide - MasterFootnote 52

Contact Information

Position

Telephone Number

Region

Introduction

My name is [insert name] and I am part of an independent consulting team working with Justice Canada to conduct an evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS). The purpose of the evaluation is to assess the relevance and performance of the AJS over the last five years. Your thoughts and opinions on the AJS are important for this evaluation, so we would be grateful if you would take time to participate in this interview. The information we gather through this interview will be grouped with other responses to ensure no one can identify a person’s unique responses. We know that some of the questions may not be relevant to you and if that is the case, let me know and we can skip those questions. We also want to make sure that you have a chance to raise any issues you think are important about the AJS. The interview will take about 45-60 minutes.

Background

Before we proceed, I’d like to give you a bit of background on the AJS to make sure you understand what the evaluation is focused on.

  • The Community-Based Justice Fund supports community-based justice programs that offer alternatives to the formal justice system; and
  • The Capacity-Building Fund supports the development of increased knowledge and skills needed for the establishment and management of community-based justice programs.

In addition, the AJS has a policy function centered in Ottawa with key contributions from five Regional Coordinators and their staff.

The objectives of the AJS are to:

  • contribute to a decrease in the rate of victimization, crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people in communities operating AJS programs;
  • assist Aboriginal people to assume greater responsibility for the administration of justice in their communities;
  • provide better and more timely information about community-based justice programs funded by the AJS; and
  • reflect and include Aboriginal values within the justice system.
Interview Questions

Before we begin, could you please tell me about your familiarity with the AJS (e.g., role, interactions)? How long have you been in this role?

A. Relevance
  1. In your opinion, does there continue to be overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in terms of victimization, crime and/or incarceration rates compared to the general population?
    1. What makes you say this?
  2. Is there a need for the Government of Canada in general and Justice Canada in particular to continue to be involved in Aboriginal justice?
    1. Why do you think so?
    2. Is there a continued need for the AJS in particular?
  3. In your opinion, are there new or emerging justice needs in line with the objectives of AJS that are not addressed by the AJS but would be appropriate for Justice Canada to address?
    1. If so, what are those needs?
    2. Can the AJS be adapted to meet those needs, and if so, how? Or is another mechanism within Justice Canada required?
B. Performance

The following questions will ask you about the extent to which certain outcomes are occurring in AJS community-based justice programs. For these questions, please use the following scale:

  1. Not at all
  2. A little
  3. To a moderate extent
  4. To a great extent
  5. To a very great extent
  1. To what extent has AJS-supported communities in developing the knowledge and skills needed to establish and manage community-based justice programs? Why do you say this? Can you please provide an example?
    1. Are you aware of any gaps that should be filled by AJS in this area?
  2. To your knowledge, to what extent do AJS-funded community-based programs incorporate community cultural values of healing and justice? Can you tell me why you think this is the case?
    1. Are there any gaps that should be filled by AJS in this area?
  3. In your opinion, to what extent has the AJS contributed to increased access to community-based justice programs and services for Aboriginal people in Canada? Why do you say that?
    1. Are there ways that access can be further enhanced?
  4. In your opinion, to what extent has the Capacity-Building Fund helped increase community capacity to deliver existing and/or new programs and services? Why do you say that?
    1. Are there any ways AJS could further help increase community capacity to deliver those types of programs or services?
  5. To what extent has AJS assisted in supporting more collaboration and integration at the community level between justice professionals and Community Justice Workers to improve Aboriginal justice? Please describe (federal-provincial-territorial, Crown, police, communities).
    1. In what ways, if any, has the AJS contributed to such an increase?
    2. Are there any gaps which could be filled by AJS in terms of supporting these collaborations and integration?
    3. [internal stakeholders only] How, and how effectively, is the AJS integrated with other programs relevant to Aboriginal justice within the Department?
  6. To what extent has the AJD undertaken policy activities to address the high rates of victimization, crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people? (research, consultation, policy advice, new initiatives, legislation). Why do you say that?
    1. Are you aware of any key gaps in this area?
  7. In your opinion, to what extent are Aboriginal people in participating communities more involved in the administration of justice as a result of the AJS? Why do you say that?
    1. Are there ways that local participation could be further enhanced? Please describe.
    2. Are you aware of any barriers to participation?
  8. Can you describe community justice strategies that are particularly effective in enhancing local Aboriginal involvement in the administration of justice that you are aware of?
  9. To what extent have formal and informal partnerships between AJS community programs and the mainstream justice system been created or maintained? To what extent are they effective at supporting AJS objectives? Why do you say that?
    1. Are you aware of any barriers to strengthening those partnerships? If so, please describe these.
    2. Can you point to benefits from strong linkages between community justice programs and the mainstream justice system? (referrals, enhanced services, better case outcomes)
      1. How are those benefits realized?
  10. Overall, in your opinion, to what extent has the AJS support contributed to improvements in safety and wellness for participating communities? Please explain. Probe for changes in the perceptions of community members.
    1. Are there any remaining gaps which should be addressed by AJS?
  11. Can you describe any other key longer-term benefits for communities participating in AJS?
    1. What factors would you say influence any improvements in communities, or a lack of improvement? (program participation/completion; program effectiveness, external factors)
C. Design and Delivery
  1. Is the cost-shared design of the Strategy appropriate considering federal-provincial-territorial roles and responsibilities? Please explain.
  2. Do you have any suggestions for improving the way in which the AJS is being delivered that would improve its performance in the achievement of objectives and/or increase its effectiveness?
D. Economy and Efficiency
  1. To what extent would you say AJS resources are allocated efficiently?
    1. Are you aware of any cost-savings or cost reallocations within the Strategy which would have improved efficiency in the last five years?
    2. Can you think of any ways to improve efficiency of AJS?
  2. Do you have any additional comments you would like to make about the AJS?

Thank you for taking the time to contribute to the AJS evaluation

Case Study Protocols

Justice Canada Evaluation Of The Aboriginal Justice Strategy

Community Case Study - Community Justice Worker Interview Guide

Community

Region

Key Informant Name

Title/Role

Consultant Name

Date of Interview

Introduction

Thank you for agreeing to this interview. My name is [insert name] and I am part of an independent consulting team working with Justice Canada to conduct an evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS). The purpose of the evaluation is to find out if the AJS is meeting communities’ needs and how it is working in the different communities. Your thoughts and opinions are important for this evaluation.

The information we gather through this interview will be grouped with other responses to ensure no one can identify a person’s responses. We know that some of the questions may not be relevant to you and if that is the case, let me know and we can skip those questions. We also want to make sure that you have a chance to raise any issues you think are important about the AJS. The interview will take about 45-60 minutes.

Do you have any questions before we start?

Note to interviewer: Prior to interview, identify through a review of the project files the names / types of activities offered in this community.

  1. It would be helpful if we could start by just getting your official title and a description of your role and responsibilities. How long have you been in this position? Which Aboriginal communities do you work with?
Community Background Information
  1. In most of the topics I will be covering, I will be asking about programs and activities for alternative justice delivery in Aboriginal communities with AJS-funded programs. It would help me to know what you think are the most pressing current justice issues in the communities you work. Can you tell me about the key issues faced by these communities? For example, are there issues with overrepresentation in the justice system?
  2. Would you say these issues are less, the same, or worse since 2011?
  3. How is your Aboriginal community justice program designed to help the communities address these issues?
Now I have a few questions specifically on the AJS programs and activities provided in the community.
  1. Could you please describe the working relationships you have with the mainstream justice system? (Crown, police, courts?)
    1. Are you satisfied with the way these relationships work at present?
    2. Have the relationships changed in recent years? If so, why?
    3. Are there particular barriers to the effectiveness of these relationships? Please describe.
    4. What improvements would you like to see, if any? (referrals, supports, follow-up)
  2. Who do you work with in the communities? (justice committee, Chief and Council, local police, health services, social services, Elders, employers, families)
    1. Are there partners that are particularly helpful in furthering your objectives? Please explain.
    2. Have the community partnerships changed in recent years? If so, why?
    3. Are there community partnerships you would like to see improved? If so, in what ways?
    4. Are there other partnerships you would like to establish?
    5. Are there any particular barriers you experience in the communities in achieving your program's objectives? Please describe.
  3. In the communities in question, have you seen a change in the type or number of program participants (offenders) in recent years? Please describe.
  4. Looking at referrals to your program in particular, in your opinion, what proportion of people was referred to the program, of those that could have been?
    1. Have referrals increased or decreased in recent years? If so, why?
    2. What do you think are the main barriers to getting more referrals?
    3. Are there steps you could take to improve referrals? Please describe.
  5. Do you think that the Aboriginal community justice program has helped make communities safer? If so, how? How can you tell?
  6. What best practices would you share with a community that was just starting an AJS program?
    1. Based on your experience, what lessons learned would you share, if any?
  7. Lower recidivism rates (or re-offence) are a clear kind of benefit that a program like yours can bring. Are there other benefits you can point to? Please provide examples.
    1. For offenders
    2. For victims
    3. For the community as a whole
    4. For community services (health, social services, police, other)
  8. Are there any community-level statistics that you collect regarding the rates of crime, victimization and case outcomes? If so, could we use this data for the evaluation? (if so collect a copy)
  9. Has your community received any additional supports through the AJS for a capacity-building project? If so, what was the project? To what extent did the project help enhance the capacity for their community-based justice program?
  10. Do you have any other comments about the local Aboriginal community justice program that you would like to share?

Case Example

We are interested in understanding how individual cases work their way through the community justice process, and how the process can lead to benefits for individuals and the community. Without providing names, please walk us through a recent case that you think made good use of your program, and describe what the impacts of the process have been. We are interested in the legal aspects, and in the interactions the offender and victim(s) may have had with others in the community, including a justice committee, the police, social services, health and wellness service providers, educators, or others.

Thank you for your participation.

Community Case Study - Police/Crown Representative Interview Guide

Community

Region

Key Informant Name

Title/Role

Consultant Name

Date of Interview

Introduction

Thank you for agreeing to this interview. My name is [insert name] and I am part of an independent consulting team working with Justice Canada to conduct an evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS). The purpose of the evaluation is to find out if the AJS is meeting communities’ needs and how it is working in the different communities. Your thoughts and opinions are important for this evaluation.

The information we gather through this interview will be grouped with other responses to ensure no one can identify a person’s responses. We know that some of the questions may not be relevant to you and if that is the case, let me know and we can skip those questions. We also want to make sure that you have a chance to raise any issues you think are important about the AJS. The interview will take about 45-60 minutes.

Do you have any questions before we start?

Note to interviewer: Prior to interview, identify through a review of the project files the names/types of activities offered in this community.

  1. It would be helpful if we could start by just getting your official title and a description of your role and responsibilities. How long have you been in this position? Which Aboriginal communities do you work with?
Community Background Information
  1. In most of the topics I will be covering, I will be asking about programs and activities for alternative justice delivery in Aboriginal communities with AJS-funded programs. It would help me to know what you think are the most pressing current justice issues in the communities you work. Can you tell me about the key issues faced by these communities? For example, are there issues with overrepresentation in the justice system?
  2. Would you say these issues are less, the same, or worse since 2011?
  3. In which ways is your Aboriginal community justice program designed to help the communities address these issues?
Now I have a few questions specifically on the AJS programs and activities provided in the community.
  1. Could you please describe the working relationship you and your colleagues have with the local community justice program? In what ways do you collaborate?
    1. Are you satisfied with the way these relationships work at present?
    2. Has the relationships changed in recent years? If so, why?
    3. Are there particular barriers to the effectiveness of these relationships? Please describe.
    4. What improvements would you like to see, if any? (referrals, supports, follow-up)
  2. In the communities in question, have you seen a change in the type or number of program participants (offenders) in recent years? Please describe.
  3. Do you refer people to the Aboriginal community justice program? If so, can you describe typical referrals?
    1. What makes it more or less likely that you will refer people to the program?
    2. Are there reasons why you might not refer people to the program even though they might meet the program criteria?
  4. In the communities in question, has there been a change since 2011 in the types of partnerships or collaborations between key people in the community and in the justice system? If so, please describe this change.
    Probe for partnerships at the community level with police, RCMP, judges, prosecutors, lawyers, AJS program staff, who are involved in the Community Justice Committee.
    1. In what ways do the different people work together?
    2. Are there any barriers to establishing effective partnerships between communities and the justice system? Please describe.
    3. What effect do these partnerships or collaborations have on the effectiveness of the community justice services?
  5. Do you think the local Aboriginal community justice program has helped make communities safer? If so, how? How can you tell?
  6. What best practices would you share with a community that was just starting an AJS program?
    1. Based on your experience, what lessons learned would you share, if any?
  7. Lower recidivism (or re-offence) rates are a clear kind of benefit that a program like AJS can bring. Are there other benefits you can point to? Please provide examples.
    1. For offenders
    2. For victims
    3. For the community as a whole
    4. For community services (health, social services, police, other)
  8. Are there any community-level statistics that you collect regarding the rates of crime, victimization and case outcomes? If so, could we use this data for the evaluation? (if so collect a copy)
  9. Do you have any other comments about the local Aboriginal community justice program that you would like to share?

Thank you for your participation.

Sharing Circle for Community Members or Community Justice Committee

Discussion Guide

Community

Region

Date

Consultant

Participant profile

Total participants in group

Number of youth

Introduction

Thank you for coming to this discussion group. My name is [name]. As you may know, Justice Canada provides funding to Aboriginal communities for programs and activities in the area of justice to put in place a justice system that is better suited to the needs of those communities, and to provide communities with more say about how the justice system works for them. Your community has a justice program that includes (briefly describe the programs and services). I am part of an independent consulting team working with Justice Canada to conduct an evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS).

We hope to have a good discussion about these programs and activities where everyone who wants to talk can feel comfortable to do so. I will ask a number of questions and take some notes as we talk. You are all invited to make a comment either in response to my question or in response to something someone else says. There are no right or wrong answers – each of you may have had different experiences with the programs or have different opinions – so we want to hear from all of you.

Your participation in this discussion group is completely voluntary and whether you agree or not to participate will not affect your relationship or your community’s relationship with Justice Canada. The information you provide will be handled in accordance with the Privacy Act. We will not identify any individuals in the notes we prepare on this discussion group.

The discussion will take about one to one and a half hour. Do you have any questions before we start?

Note – We will identify with the community contact if it would be appropriate to have one of the Elders attending to say an opening prayer or sweet grass ceremony if this is the community custom.

Before we move onto the questions, perhaps you could introduce yourselves and tell us a little bit about what you do in your community.

First, I would like to start by asking you questions about justice programs.

  1. What do you feel are the biggest issues in your community in terms of justice and crime? For example, are there high numbers of Aboriginal people in jail or high numbers of victims of crime? Have these changed since 2011?
  2. What kinds of services are you aware of in your community that can help prevent crime or help victims of crimes or people who committed crimes? Prompt with names and list of community activities and programs from the Community Work Plan
  3. Part of the idea of the Aboriginal community justice programs is to help communities have a justice system in line with local culture, traditions and values. Do you think this is true of your community justice program? Please explain.
  4. Are the justice programs and activities helping:
    • The community?
    • Victims of crime?
    • Offenders?
    • Others?
  5. What works well with the local justice activities and programs?
    1. How would you improve them?
  6. Overall, do you think the local community justice program has helped improve safety in your community? Why or why not?
  7. Do you have any other comments about the justice system in your community that you would like to share?

Thank you for your participation.

Evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy

Survey of Community Justice Workers

Introduction

Goss Gilroy Inc. (GGI) is working with Justice Canada to conduct an evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS). The goal of the evaluation is to better understand the need for the programs and impacts at the community level. This survey will give us important information about how the programs are or are not working for the communities.

The information from this survey will be grouped with other responses so that no one can identify your responses. Your responses are confidential, and no responses will be attributed to any person in any reporting. All information will be kept according to the Privacy Act and other applicable privacy laws.

Thank you in advance for your participation.

Please note that many of the questions refer to a five-year time period (the scope of the evaluation). If you have not been in your position for at least five years, please use the time frame during which you have been in your position.

  1. How many years of experience do you have working as a Community Justice Worker in your community?
    1. Less than 1 year
    2. 1-2 years
    3. 3-5 years
    4. 6-10 years
    5. 11 or more years
  2. What do you feel are the biggest issues in your community in terms of justice and crime?
    Please check all that apply.
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Large percentage of community members accused of crimes or in prison            
Large percentage of community members are victims of crime            
High rates of crime in the community            
Not enough services and supports that fit with aboriginal cultures            
Not enough services that focus on healing and reconciliation            
Discrimination/bias in the justice system            
Not enough support for Aboriginal victims of crime            
Other (please specify:)            
  1. [only show options selected in Q2] How well is the AJS currently helping with these issues?
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Large percentage of community members accused of crimes or in prison            
Large percentage of community members are victims of crime            
High rates of crime in the community            
Not enough services and supports that fit with aboriginal cultures            
Not enough services that focus on healing and reconciliation            
Discrimination/bias in the justice system            
Not enough support for Aboriginal victims of crime            
Other (please specify:)            
  1. Do you get referrals to the AJS Program from:
Referrals from Never Sometimes Often
Police?      
Crown?      
Community Agencies?      
Families, friends?      
Schools?      
Businesses?      
Elders?      
Chief and council?      
Corrections?      
Self-referrals?      
  1. [if never or sometimes in Q4] To the best of your knowledge, what are some of the reasons you are not getting referrals from:
Reason Police Crown Community Agencies Families, friends Self-referrals
Program meets a need          
Those who commit crimes want to be part of the program          
Victims of crime want to be part of the program          
They believe that people are less likely to commit another crime after taking part in program          
They believe that the alternative Aboriginal system is more culturally appropriate for the offenders          
They believe that victims are less likely to be victims again because of the program          
Other (please specify:)          
  1. [if often in Q4] What are some of the reasons police, Crown attorneys and other criminal justice professionals refer individuals to the program?
Reason Police Crown Community Agencies Families, friends Self-referrals
Program meets a need          
Those who commit crimes want to be part of the program          
Victims of crime want to be part of the program          
They believe that people are less likely to commit another crime after taking part in program          
They believe that the alternative Aboriginal system is more culturally appropriate for the offenders          
They believe that victims are less likely to be victims again because of the program          
They believe that the program helps make sure there is less crime in their community          
Other (please specify:)          
  1. In the last five years, how have your collaborations or partnerships with police, Crown attorneys and other criminal justice professionals changed?
    1. Have decreased a lot
    2. Have decreased a little
    3. Have stayed the same
    4. Have increased a little
    5. Have increased a lot
    6. Not sure
  2. In what ways do you work with police, Crown attorneys and other criminal justice professionals?
    Please check all that apply
    1. Periodic joint planning of policing in the community
    2. Pre-referral consultation for individual cases
    3. Referrals
    4. Post-referral follow-up
    5. Other (please specify:)
  3. Are your partnerships/collaborations with the police, Crown attorneys and other criminal justice professionals helping improve the services in the communities?
    1. Not at all
    2. A little
    3. Somewhat
    4. To a fair degree
    5. To a great degree
  4. [if Q9 is c-e] In what ways do your partnerships/collaborations improve the services delivered in the communities?
    1. Help decrease crime rates
    2. Better options available when an arrest is made
    3. Victims/witnesses more likely to come forward
    4. Improved collaboration with the local justice committee
    5. Police are more accepted in the community now
    6. Police are seen as more fair
    7. Community members are more satisfied with police force
    8. Better relationship with offenders
    9. Other (please specify:)
  5. In your opinion, to what extent are the AJS community-based justice programs helping support the following achievements:
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Community-based justice programs are changed to fit the community’s needs            
Increasing integration of justice-related services at the community level            
Providing culturally relevant community-based alternative to justice programs            
Community-based justice programs reflect values of healing and reconciliation            
Capacity in funded community-based programs has increased            
Justice professionals are referring Aboriginal individuals to the community-based justice programs            
Lower recidivism rates among individuals who participate in community-based justice programs            
Decrease in victimization rates in communities with community-based justice programs            
Decrease in case backlog in the mainstream justice system            
Increased community health and safety            
  1. In what ways could the community-based justice programs become more involved in the administration of justice?
    Please select all that apply
    1. Increase awareness of the program among justice stakeholders
    2. Increase awareness of the program among community members
    3. Decrease turnover among Community Justice Workers
    4. Increase access to more alternative justice remedies
    5. Increase cultural sensitivity in programs and services
    6. Increase collaborations with justice stakeholders
    7. More training of community-level workers
    8. Increase capacity of Community Justice Workers
    9. Other (please specify:)
    10. None, currently involved at the right level
  2. In your opinion, to what extent do the following factors help the success of a person in an Aboriginal justice community-based justice program?
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Youth/young age            
Number of previous convictions            
Housing stability            
Bond with parents/family            
Employment            
Positive peer associations            
Other (please specify:)            
  1. In your opinion, to what extent do the following aspects of the program contribute to success of the community-based justice program?
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Early involvement of Aboriginal Courtworker            
Participating in a community-based justice program            
Level of contact/interaction with participant (e.g., frequency and degree of participation)            
Having a recognized/established program to refer people to            
Types of services offered            
Other (please specify:)            
  1. In your opinion, what are some of the elements that make a community-based justice program successful? (e.g., types of services offered, partnerships and/or collaboration with mainstream justice professionals and the Community Justice Workers, support of the community for the program).

Evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy

Survey of Law Enforcement and Crown Representatives

Introduction

Goss Gilroy Inc. (GGI) is working with Justice Canada to conduct an evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS). The goal of the evaluation is to better understand the need for the programs and impacts at the community level. This survey will give us important information about how the programs are or are not working for the communities as well as for police and Crown representatives.

The information from this survey will be grouped with other responses so that no one can identify your responses. Your responses are confidential, and no responses will be attributed to any person in any reporting. All information will be kept according to the Privacy Act and other applicable privacy laws.

Thank you in advance for your participation.

Please note that many of the questions refer to a five-year time period (the scope of the evaluation). If you have not been in your position for at least five years, please use the time frame during which you have been in your position.

The next series of questions will help us make sure you get questions relevant to your role and that we group your responses with others similar to you.

  1. Are you currently a law enforcement or Crown representative?
    1. Crown prosecutor or other type of attorney/Crown representative
    2. RCMP representative
    3. Aboriginal police representative (e.g., band, council)
    4. Other police force representative
    5. Other (please specify:)
  2. Please select the province or territory in which you work:
    [include a drop down list of provinces and territories]
  3. How aware are you of the community-based justice programs under the AJS?
    1. Not at all (if selected, end the survey)
    2. A little
    3. To a fair degree
    4. To a great degree
  4. Which of the following communities with community-based justice programs have you worked with? (please select from the list below all that apply)

Insert list based on region respondent is from.

The next series of questions will focus on the Aboriginal communities you have identified above.

  1. How many years have you worked with the Aboriginal communities?
    1. Less than 1 year
    2. 1-2 years
    3. 3-5 years
    4. 6-10 years
    5. 11 or more years
  2. [if Q5 is b-d] For cases that are eligible, how often are you referring Aboriginal people to the community-based justice programs? (e.g., adult and youth diversion, victim support services, crime prevention activities)
    1. Never
    2. Almost never (1-24% of the time)
    3. Some of the time (25-49% of the time)
    4. Most of the time (50-69% of the time)
    5. Almost all the time (70-89% of the time)
    6. All the time (90-100% of the time)
  3. [if c-f in Q6] What are some of the reasons you refer individuals to the community-based justice program?
    Please select all that apply
    1. They are meeting a need
    2. Offenders/accused ask to be part of the program
    3. Victims ask to be part of the program
    4. You believe that the Community Justice Worker can refer them to the right programs
    5. You believe that offenders/accused are less likely to re-offend after participating in community-based justice programs
    6. You believe that the alternative Aboriginal system is more culturally appropriate for the offenders
    7. You believe that victims are less likely to be re-victimized through community-based justice programs
    8. You believe that community-based justice programs help decrease crime levels in communities
    9. Other (please specify:)
  4. [if a or b in Q7] What are some of the reasons you do not refer individuals to the community-based justice programs?
    Please select all that apply
    1. No cases are eligible
    2. You are unsure what happens after an individual is referred
    3. There are no services/supports to refer to in the community
    4. You do not believe that the community-based justice program is an appropriate alternative
    5. There has been staff turnover at the community-based justice system and you are not confident that they can handle it.
    6. Other (please specify:)
  5. What activities characterize your working relationship with the community-based justice programs?
    Please check all that apply
    1. Periodic joint planning of justice in the community
    2. Pre-referral consultation for individual cases
    3. Referrals
    4. Post-referral follow-up
    5. Other (please specify:)
  6. In the last five years, how have your collaborations and/or partnerships with the Community Justice Workers changed in the targeted communities?
    1. Have decreased a great deal
    2. Have decreased a little
    3. Have stayed the same
    4. Have increased a little
    5. Have increased a great deal
    6. Not sure
  7. Does your working relationship with Aboriginal justice representatives (e.g., Aboriginal Justice Worker) support the delivery of more seamless or integrated justice services in the communities?
    1. Not at all
    2. A little
    3. Somewhat
    4. To a fair degree
    5. To a great degree
  8. In your opinion, to what extent are the AJS community-based justice programs helping support the following achievements:
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Community-based justice programs are adapted to the community’s needs            
Increasing integration of justice-related services at the community level            
Providing culturally relevant community-based alternative to justice programs            
Community-based justice programs reflect values of healing and reconciliation            
Capacity in funded community-based programs has increased            
Justice professionals are referring Aboriginal individuals to the community-based justice programs            
Lower recidivism rates among individuals who participate in community-based justice programs            
Decrease in victimization rates in communities with community-based justice programs            
Decrease in case backlog in the mainstream justice system            
Increased community health and safety            
  1. In what ways could the AJS community-based justice programs become more involved in the administration of justice?
    Please select all that apply
    1. Increase awareness of the program among justice stakeholders
    2. Increase awareness of the program among community members
    3. Increase capacity of Community Justice Workers
    4. Increase availability of programs at the community level
    5. Decrease turnover in Community Justice Workers
    6. Increase access to alternative justice remedies
    7. Increase cultural sensitivity
    8. Increase collaborations with justice stakeholders
    9. More training of community-level workers
    10. Other (please specify:)
    11. None, currently involved at the right level
  2. In your opinion, to what extent do the following factors contribute to success for individuals in an Aboriginal community-based justice program?
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Youth/young age            
Number of previous convictions            
Housing stability            
Bond with parents/family            
Employment            
Positive peer associations            
Other (please specify:)            
  1. In your opinion, to what extent do the following aspects of the program contribute to success of the community-based justice program?
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Early involvement of Aboriginal Courtworker            
Level of contact/interaction with participant (e.g., frequency and degree of participation)            
Completing a community-based justice program            
Having a recognized/established program to refer people to            
Types of services offered            
Other (please specify:)            
  1. In your opinion, what are some of the elements that make a community-based justice program successful? (e.g., types of services offered, partnerships and/or collaboration with mainstream justice professionals and the Community Justice Workers, support of the community for the program)
  2. From your perspective, to what extent are the following ongoing issues for Aboriginal people in the area you work in?
  To a very large extent To a large extent Somewhat To a small extent Not at all Unsure
Overrepresentation in the justice system            
Overrepresentation as victims of crime            
Overrepresentation in the number of crimes committed            
Lack of culturally appropriate services and supports            
Not enough focus in the current system on healing and reconciliation            
Discrimination against Aboriginal people            
Lack of capacity in the system to support Aboriginal offenders            
Lack of capacity in the system to support Aboriginal victims of crime            
Lack of collaboration among different stakeholders in the system            
Other (please specify:)            
  1. [only show options selected above] In your opinion, how well are the community-based justice programs currently helping address these issues?
  Not at all A little Somewhat A lot Entirely Unsure
Overrepresentation in the justice system            
Overrepresentation as victims of crime            
Overrepresentation in the number of crimes committed            
Lack of culturally appropriate services and supports            
Not enough focus in current system on healing and reconciliation            
Discrimination against Aboriginal people            
Lack of capacity in system to support Aboriginal offenders            
Lack of capacity in system to support Aboriginal victims of crime            
Lack of collaboration among different stakeholders in the system            
Other (please specify:)            
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